johnhefti:

Chioma Ubogagu

johnhefti:

Chioma Ubogagu


+ 12.16.12
♥ 12 notes
Tagged as: chioma ubogagu stanford soccer women's soccer stanford women's soccer
Reblogged from johnhefti, Originally posted by johnhefti
uswntlover94:

@UNCwomensSoccer: “I’m not telling you it’s going to be easy, i’m telling you it is going to be worth it.” #NationalChampions  #TFLF
I love this pic so much! The beautiful game. Hard work pays off! :)

uswntlover94:

@UNCwomensSoccer: “I’m not telling you it’s going to be easy, i’m telling you it is going to be worth it.”
#NationalChampions
#TFLF

I love this pic so much! The beautiful game. Hard work pays off! :)


xiquarterly:

Mexican captain Monica Gonzalez pictured above shaking hands with USWNT captain Kristine Lilly at an October 2005 international at Blackbaud Stadium in Charleston. Born in Corpus Christi, Texas, in issue one of XI Quarterly she talks to Jeff Kassouf about her experiences as an American-born star for the Mexican national women’s soccer team.

“I can tell you right now, I never would have gotten 89 caps [with the U.S.].” Gonzalez says. “Never.”

Photo Credit: Scott Bales/YCJ
Subscribe now to XI Quarterly and receive a special introductory offer

xiquarterly:

Mexican captain Monica Gonzalez pictured above shaking hands with USWNT captain Kristine Lilly at an October 2005 international at Blackbaud Stadium in Charleston. Born in Corpus Christi, Texas, in issue one of XI Quarterly she talks to Jeff Kassouf about her experiences as an American-born star for the Mexican national women’s soccer team.

“I can tell you right now, I never would have gotten 89 caps [with the U.S.].” Gonzalez says. “Never.”

Photo Credit: Scott Bales/YCJ

Subscribe now to XI Quarterly and receive a special introductory offer


+ 9.25.12
♥ 37 notes
Tagged as: Monica Gonzalez Mexico Women's Soccer USWNT Soccer Football large
Reblogged from xiquarterly, Originally posted by xiquarterly
thrace-:

On a slightly brighter note: Leslie Osborne helped keep Boston women’s soccer alive

It was Osborne who spent her offseason recruiting investors and players, attempting to ensure that the team would have enough money and talent to continue to play in the WPS and, after that folded, the WPSL Elite League. She helped make it happen, something she said she felt duty-bound to do.
But will others follow? As women’s soccer works on building a future from uncertainty, its players grapple with how involved they have to be to make it succeed. They are, after all, their sport’s greatest ambassadors. Do they need to be activists, too?
“We felt like we could be utilized a lot more,” said Kia McNeill, who played at Boston College and was slated to play for the Philadelphia Independence. “I think it’s great what Leslie Osborne did, and I wish a lot of other girls, particularly those with the national team, would have stepped up and taken on that type of role. I know some of them did. A lot of them didn’t.”
Many women’s soccer players get involved with their local communities, teaching clinics, reaching out to young players, raising interest and awareness. Osborne did more. She met with wealthy supporters of the sport, helped identify potential investors, did the behind-the-scenes work that is generally not the province of players.
“I felt an obligation, I felt how lucky I was to have the opportunity to play for my country, to play professionally,” Osborne said. “I want other kids to have the same opportunity and dream to one day play professionally like I did.
“When our main owner left and we needed to find new ownership, the easy thing would have been to move on. Myself and a couple people that truly cared about this organization took the initiative to find new owners. It was a lot of work and it was challenging, but I loved every minute of it.”

Leslie Osborne, man.   There’s a reason the Breakers faithful love her, and not just for the way she plays.

thrace-:

On a slightly brighter note: Leslie Osborne helped keep Boston women’s soccer alive


It was Osborne who spent her offseason recruiting investors and players, attempting to ensure that the team would have enough money and talent to continue to play in the WPS and, after that folded, the WPSL Elite League. She helped make it happen, something she said she felt duty-bound to do.

But will others follow? As women’s soccer works on building a future from uncertainty, its players grapple with how involved they have to be to make it succeed. They are, after all, their sport’s greatest ambassadors. Do they need to be activists, too?

“We felt like we could be utilized a lot more,” said Kia McNeill, who played at Boston College and was slated to play for the Philadelphia Independence. “I think it’s great what Leslie Osborne did, and I wish a lot of other girls, particularly those with the national team, would have stepped up and taken on that type of role. I know some of them did. A lot of them didn’t.”

Many women’s soccer players get involved with their local communities, teaching clinics, reaching out to young players, raising interest and awareness. Osborne did more. She met with wealthy supporters of the sport, helped identify potential investors, did the behind-the-scenes work that is generally not the province of players.

“I felt an obligation, I felt how lucky I was to have the opportunity to play for my country, to play professionally,” Osborne said. “I want other kids to have the same opportunity and dream to one day play professionally like I did.

“When our main owner left and we needed to find new ownership, the easy thing would have been to move on. Myself and a couple people that truly cared about this organization took the initiative to find new owners. It was a lot of work and it was challenging, but I loved every minute of it.”

Leslie Osborne, man.   There’s a reason the Breakers faithful love her, and not just for the way she plays.


+ 7.13.12
♥ 30 notes
Tagged as: wpsl-elite leslie osborne boston breakers women's soccer
Reblogged from thrace-, Originally posted by thrace-
xiquarterly:

Florida State College women’s soccer team, 1927.
Source: Florida Memory

xiquarterly:

Florida State College women’s soccer team, 1927.

Source: Florida Memory


+ 7.02.12
♥ 9 notes
Tagged as: Florida Women's Soccer Football Soccer 1920s History Sports large
Reblogged from xiquarterly, Originally posted by xiquarterly
xiquarterly:

On the day WPS was put to rest permanently, remembering a brighter moment for the league.

In this Sept. 16, 2008 photo, Boston Breakers coach Tony DiCicco, left, stands with players Kristine Lilly, Angela Hucles and Heather Mitts, and Women’s Professional Soccer league commissioner Tonya Antonucci during the allocation draft in New York.

AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews

xiquarterly:

On the day WPS was put to rest permanently, remembering a brighter moment for the league.

In this Sept. 16, 2008 photo, Boston Breakers coach Tony DiCicco, left, stands with players Kristine Lilly, Angela Hucles and Heather Mitts, and Women’s Professional Soccer league commissioner Tonya Antonucci during the allocation draft in New York.

AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews


+ 6.21.12
♥ 9 notes
Tagged as: WPS Women's Soccer Kristine Lilly Angela Hucles Heather Mitts Soccer Football
Reblogged from xiquarterly, Originally posted by xiquarterly

W-League just started, here's a preview »


+ 5.14.12
♥ 1 note
Tagged as: w-league soccer women's soccer

"Some WPS players will look for jobs in Europe — top clubs in Sweden, Germany and France are professional. Players who aren’t tied to their WPS clubs, should the teams compete elsewhere in 2012, will be looking for places to play, and the 27-team W-League and 76-team WPSL include fully professional teams.

Several L.A.-area clubs will be destinations: The Orange County Waves won the WPSL title last year; the Pali Blues possess two W-League titles; the WPSL’s L.A. Vikings and W-League’s Santa Clarita Blue Heat and L.A. Strikers have growing aspirations.

“I’ve already spoken to several [players],” Pali Blues coach Charlie Naimo, who was the L.A. Sol’s general manager, said a few hours after the WPS announcement. “Right now they’re heavy-hearted, they need to take a break and are disappointed, and they’re going to find the environment that helps them stay on top of their game. I don’t think there will be a lot of options to go play for money.”

Pali is an amateur club, which enables it to use players with college eligibility. The Waves are semipro but working out thorny financial issues. The Vikings, Blue Star and longtime WPSL amateur power Ajax America could be attractive for players. So could San Diego’s WPSL sides."

WPS: What is the impact on L.A.? - A California-centric but overall good piece on how WPSL may absorb a lot of WPS players this season


+ 2.06.12
♥ 2 notes
Tagged as: wps wpsl w-league women's soccer

"So far I have been in Stockholm for a little over two weeks and I have loved every minute. My teammates are incredible, the city is beautiful, and the level of play is impressive. I did not waste any time in getting on a pitch as I arrived on Tuesday, August 30th and played the second half of our game on Wednesday, August 31st! Since then I have started and played three games before the league took a break for FIFA dates. In two short weeks I have adjusted to yet another place to call home.

The first thing that struck me was the language. Our pre-game talks, drills during practice, and team meetings are all spoken in Swedish. I came here knowing two words in Swedish (thanks to former teammate Caroline Seger) and rarely is instruction given to the team in English. I have a completely newfound respect for every international that has played in WPS. To step in to a top-level league and not speak the language is intimidating. That being said, I have several wonderful teammates that act as translators and so far I have been able to keep up."

Whitney Engen’s Dispatches from Sweden: First Impressions - Engen’s on loan to Tyresö FF during the WPS offseason. I think this will be a really interesting column.


+ 9.22.11
♥ 9 notes
Tagged as: whitney engen uswnt wps women's soccer
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